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JCrete 2016 JCrete Articles

Jack Shirazi’s JCrete® 2016 Report

So I went to JCrete and had some really interesting discussions. Then I watched a bunch of the JVM Language Summit recordings. Then I looked at some of the frameworks that are alternatives for implementing concurrent applications. Then I looked through a bunch of libraries which provide new collection classes of all sorts. And after all that I realised that this is now the most dynamic, interesting, innovative time we’ve ever seen for Java! More than 20 years of ever improving Java and, instead of maturing and slowing down, we’re actually accelerating improvements in Java all the way from the very bottom of the stack (Java built in Java) on through every stage – new language features, new bytecodes, new JVM structures, new compiler capabilities, new hardware support, new monitoring and management, new data structures, new frameworks, even new manifestos! This is extraordinary and unexpected and delightful.

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JCrete 2016 JCrete Articles

Nick Ebbitt’s JCrete® 2016 Report

As the conference grew nearer the thought of joining up with so many talented people from the Java community was quite daunting. I believe at least 20% of attendees were Java Champions and many had made very important contributions to the Java ecosystem.

The setting for the conference was the Orthodox Academy of Crete (OAC) located in a small fishing village called Kolymbari on the north coast of the island. Most attendees stayed at the OAC, as well as it hosting the majority of the conference sessions.

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JCrete 2016 JCrete Articles

Tomasz Nurkiewicz’s JCrete® 2016 Report

I don’t always write conference reviews. But when I do, they are about awesome ones. And JCrete was truly awesome. I got invited by Heinz Kabutz himself and this is pretty much the only way to get there. JCrete is an uncoference with no tickets and no designated speakers. Besides there is no conference fee but also everyone pays for themselves. This feels a lot more like a group of people meeting each other informally rather than a full-blown, very official conference.  Read more …